What's Up at the TAS

ZOOM Lecture

November 10, 2020

by 

Bob Blair

William Henry Jackson: Pioneer Photographer, Freehand Artist

and Archaeologist

Looking at Jackson’s 99 year life span with an emphasis on his Southwestern archaeological work and the relevance of his life’s work today. 

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ID 5458429500


Bob Blair has resided in Arroyo Hondo, New Mexico, for four decades where he worked and retired from careers as an elementary school teacher and as a licensed New Mexico building contractor. He continues work as a river raft guide, a Nordic ski instructor and ski patrol person. For over four decades he has researched the life and work of William Henry Jackson, a noted member of the Hayden Survey of the Territories, who is best known for creating scores of the earliest photographs and sketches of the Western United States.


During his tenure with the Survey he did some of the earliest archaeology/anthropology work in the Four Corners area. Bob enlarged and republished a relatively unknown Jackson autobiography, William Henry Jackson’s “The Pioneer Photographer” in 2005. In 2018 he finalized the “Addendum” to the William Henry Jackson Collection: Scotts Bluff National Monument, organizing and adding provenance to Jackson’s personal collection that resides at Scotts Bluff National Monument.



Click here to View the presentation

Kellam Throgmorton gave on October 13, 2020,

Social Groups at the Basketmaker-Pueblo Transition:

Interpretations from the Procession Panel


 

In this lecture Kellam suggests that the Procession Panel on Comb Ridge (SE Utah) contains valuable information about the size of households and villages during the late Basketmaker III and early Pueblo I period. He argues that the Procession Panel depicts a community in transition, when some households began to reorganize as members of lineages and materialized this relationship by constructing large, multihousehold surface dwellings. However, not all households organized into lineage-scale groups, and these differences between these two kinds of social organization created fault lines where social inequalities could later develop.

Kellam Throgmorton is a public archaeologist whose research addresses cultural landscapes, monumentality, and political organization. He is the supervisory archaeologist at Crow Canyon Archaeological Center.


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